Cancer Services Northeast Indiana | Cancer Services Northeast Indiana Cancer Services Northeast Indiana – Page 39 – Cancer Services Northeast Indiana

Gail Hamm, Program Director, Earns New Certification

Gail Hamm, program director for Cancer Services of Northeast Indiana, has been certified by the Board of Oncology Social Work Certification. This process required extensive documentation of education, training, professional affiliations, community, and professional involvement, and day-to-day work responsibilities with oncology patients. This prestigious qualification is held by only three other individuals in the state of Indiana. Hamm is a licensed clinical social worker with over 20 years of social work experience in hospital, hospice and palliative care, community social services and grief and loss.

Dianne May, President and CEO, says, “This certification is one more example of Cancer Services’ commitment to high quality programs and services for all people with cancer in our region.”

Luers and Snider Volleyball Teams Play to Support Cancer Services

At last night’s match up between Bishop Luers and Snider High Schools volleyball teams, students raised money for Cancer Services of Northeast Indiana by selling pink t-shirts and hosting a raffle. Cancer Services staff members Kathy Ryan and Linda Bewley attended the game. We’d like to thank the schools and the teams for their support and the following sponsors: Physicians Health Plan, Crumback-Symons Chevrolet, Indiana Physical Therapy, Vera Bradley, American Sealants, Biomet Heartland, Buffalo Wings & Ribs, Carson Boxberger Attorneys, Design Collaborative, Flowers of Canterbury, The Law Offics of Leonard, Hammond, Thoma & Terrill, Old National Insurance, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Associates, Ortho Northeast, Performance Plus Volleyball, and Tiffany Nails.

Sharing Ideas Across the USA

by Gail Hamm, program director

Dianne and I just returned from a CANSA conference in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. CANSA is a loosely knit organization of local, not-for-profit cancer service agencies from across the country. Some were formed in the 1940’s, as was Cancer Services of Northeast Indiana (1944), and others are relatively young (5 years or less). Some of these are 1-person volunteer agencies and others are larger with paid staff.

This group tries to gather yearly to share ideas and provide encouragement for each other. Much mentoring occurs at these gatherings, as does idea gathering for programs, and of course, a bit of fun. The ideas shared by sister agencies often show up as new programs or new ways to evaluate programs. Many cancer clients and their families across the country are benefitting from our meetings, phone calls and emails between conferences.

You can find a local cancer service agency by checking with your county United Way, a hospital or hospice social worker, or by calling me at Cancer Services of Northeast Indiana. We have a list of many agencies like ours across the country, but are constantly looking for more of them.

No matter what community you live in, be sure to share your time, talents and financial resources with your local cancer service organization. What a difference we all make!

East Noble and Eastside High Schools Volley for a Cure

On September 14, the East Noble and Eastside Volleyball teams held a special event during their volleyball match called Volley for a Cure. The two teams hosted the event to raise money for Cancer Services of Northeast Indiana.

In the words of the team captains, Lauren Fulk and Megan Strock, “The night was about more than a volleyball match. It was about taking the idea of teamwork to the next level. Two communities, working together for one common goal; to raise money to help their friends and neighbors who are in need of assistance from Cancer Services of Northeast Indiana. By everyone giving a little, together we made a big difference for someone. So no matter what the outcome of the match, in our ‘playbook’ everyone here is a winner!”

The teams raised over $2900 for Cancer Services of Northeast Indiana.

Cancer Day At Kroger- Wednesday, October 6

Join us, along with Kroger, The American Cancer Society, Lutheran Hospital and Parkview Hospital, on Wednesday, October 6 for the 32nd Annual Cancer Day.

The Kroger Scott’s Cancer Day 2010 event will include 19 Kroger, Scott’s and Owens stores in Northeast Indiana. Kroger will donate 2% of sales on October 6th to the ACS and CSNI. And you can help raise more money by contributing your change by rounding up your purchase from Wednesday, October 6th to Saturday, October 16th. Round up proceeds last year totaled nearly $25,000, split between ACS and CSNI, and Kroger officials hope to raise considerably more than $25,000 this year. “Kroger Scott’s Cancer Day 2009” total proceeds were $87,377.88. Over 31 years, the annual Cancer Day event has raised $4,403,878 for local cancer organizations.

Singing Cows

by Dianne May, President & CEO

When he was five years old, I had to explain to my son, that while God gave me many good gifts, he didn’t give me the gift of a singing voice. With the compassionate heart of a child my son quickly assured me that my singing was beautiful. I know better but, I still like to sing.

The memory of that conversation makes me smile. I think acknowledging shortcomings and being able to laugh at our fumbles and foibles is a wonderful road to acceptance. Sure, there are values and ideals that we hold dear and for which we should always strive. But, how many times do we place unnecessary, even impossible expectations on ourselves and others?

What would happen if the house wasn’t vacuumed today or the car washed before the weekend? What would happen if we looked at life with new eyes? If we learned to say, “Oh well, let’s give it a try anyway and see what happens!” When was the last time that you laughed at the project that didn’t go according to plan?

Laughter can have great healing power for the soul and the body. The great American painter Grant Wood said: “I found the answer (to how and what to paint) when I joined a school of painters in Paris after the war who called themselves neomeditationist. They believed an artist had to wait for inspiration, very quietly. And they did most of the waiting at the Café du Dome or the Rotonde with brandy. It was then that I realized that all the really good ideas I’d ever had came to me while I was milking a cow. So I went back to Iowa.

Give it a try, roll with the punches, laugh when it doesn’t turn out exactly right and know how good that laughter feels. Good for the soul and the body.

Tie1On4 Prostate Cancer Seminar- A Success!

by Bill Seidel

Cancer Services of Northeast Indiana and Us TOO International sponsored a successful seminar on prostate cancer and men’s health on Saturday, September 18. The seminar was held at Cancer Services and featured six speakers addressing topics, such as PSA Screening and Active Surveillance, Surgical Options for Prostate Cancer, Systemic Treatments such as Immunotherapy and Provenge, Nutrition, Exercise and Enhancing Men’s Sexual Health. Not surprisingly the session on enhancing sexual health was the most heavily attended. All speakers provided interesting information in an entertaining format. We hope to make this an annual event.

The Us TOO Information Table. Us TOO International provides extensive information on prostate cancer in all of its various forms and ramifications. The most popular publications were made available for attendees.

Dr. Jeff Schneider, Director of Northeast Indiana Urology Prostate Cancer Center, addresses a session on PSA Screening and Active Surveillance.

Gals gather at the registration desk. Left to right are Linda Johnson, Mary Vandekeere, and Laine Seidel.

Attendees take a break in the refreshment area.

Ed Souers poses with his 1954 Hudson Hornet, an added attraction at the recent Tie1On 4Prostate Cancer© seminar. There were only 26 such cars built.

Sacred Space

by Gail Hamm, program director

Sitting with a client or family member who is expressing deep emotion can be uncomfortable. But it is equally uncomfortable for the person who is opening her heart and expressing her deepest feelings. Cancer Services’ advocates experience this opportunity on a daily basis. I say opportunity, because it is an opportunity. It’s an opportunity to actively listen and not have to offer advice or solutions; an opportunity to share sacred space with another human being.

What do you say to a man who has just told you that he has two months to live? What do you say to a mother who has just told you that her daughter will never see her sixth birthday? Advocates do not take this responsibility lightly. They realize the sacredness of the moment. It is all about being. Being present, being thoughtful, being in a listening mode. It is not necessarily about doing.

Care and compassion, empathy and acceptance…..being with our clients and their families is the greatest gift Cancer Services’ advocates can give.

Go to top