Side by side. Every step of the way.

Kroger/Scott’s Cancer Day Was a Huge Success!

Posted on October 28th, 2010

The Kroger Co.’s Central Division, American Cancer Society of Northeast Indiana (ACS) and Cancer Services of Northeast Indiana (CSNI) announced results of the 32nd annual “Kroger Scott’s Cancer Day 2010” today. The event included 19 Kroger, Scott’s and Owens stores in Northeast Indiana. Kroger is donating 2% of sales on Wednesday, October 6th to the ACS and CSNI, “rounded up” to $50,000. Kroger and Scott’s customers were encouraged to contribute their change to the cancer organizations by “rounding up” their purchases from Wednesday, October 6th to Saturday, October 16th, bringing an additional $12,056 for the two cancer organizations. In addition, Kroger donated a $46,000 advertising campaign in support of both Cancer Day and the two local cancer organizations.

Kroger Scott’s Cancer Day 2010” total proceeds were $62,056. Over 32 years, the annual Cancer Day event has raised $4,465,934 for local cancer organizations.

According to Kroger Central Division President Bob Moeder, “We are determined to be a compassionate and supportive corporate citizen in every local community we serve. Kroger customers and associates always have been especially generous in supporting Cancer Day and we are hopeful that will be the case this year. Although proceeds were down in 2010 versus 2009 and 2009 versus 2008, we are very determined to continue working hard and investing Kroger’s resources in this extremely worthy cause. Cancer has too devastating an effect on so many members of the Kroger family to do otherwise. This year we really focused on celebrating our survivors and we will continue to honor through our efforts. To prevail, we must work as a team and Kroger is deeply honored to work with Cancer Services of Northeast Indiana, the American Cancer Society, Parkview Hospital, Lutheran Hospital, Mayor Henry and nearly 200 community volunteers more than two dozen community organizations to raise critical funds for the fight against cancer.”

Dianne May, President and CEO of Cancer Services of Northeast Indiana stated, “Last year more than 3,000 local people with cancer and their families received emotional support and practical resources from Cancer Services because of corporate leaders like Kroger. We are honored to have a long-standing relationship with Kroger that continues to grow and find new ways to make sure that friends and neighbors in our community know that there is an organization ready to help when a family is touched by cancer.”

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Next Step for Targeted Cancer Therapy?

Posted on October 27th, 2010

by Lauran Neergaard of the Associated Press 9/28/10
WASHINGTON — Cancer is a tale of two sets of genetic code, your own and your tumor’s — and tracing the unique areas of damage makes for a way to target treatment.

Fifty years after the discovery of the first direct genetic link to cancer, scientists are assessing the state of so-called targeted therapy — with nearly 30 treatments on the market and a dozen or so more under study.

“We’re still not using the ‘C’ word, ‘cure,’” cautioned personalized medicine director Jeff Boyd of Fox Chase Cancer Center, who helped organized a meeting in Philadelphia today to mark the anniversary and examine the future of targeted therapy.

But, he added, “there is real potential to transform many cancers into chronic diseases.”

One next challenge is how to expand the number of targets to attack, in part by answering what the new chief of the National Cancer Institute calls the “big questions” about what makes this disease so intractable.

Questions like: What makes a tumor metastasize, or spread through the body? Metastasis is what kills, yet scientists don’t know why some tumors spread and others don’t, and what programs those tumor cells to invade, say, the liver instead of the bone or the lung — factors that undoubtedly could be new treatment targets.

Starting in October, Dr. Harold Varmus, the NCI’s director, will begin quizzing top researchers from around the country about which of oncology’s underlying mysteries should be part of his “Big Questions Initiative,” a new focus of government cancer research.

Answering those questions “would get you over a roadblock that keeps us from making better progress,” Varmus told a meeting of his scientific advisers earlier this month.

For Dr. Otis Brawley of the American Cancer Society, such a project might finally offer clues to a huge problem facing patients today: How to tell who needs the most aggressive treatment, and who would be OK skipping the big guns.

A domino effect of genetic alterations is required to cause any of the 200 diseases collectively called cancer. Some occur in the person, making them more prone to illness. But tumors also have their own genetic signature — four to seven genetic changes that are critical to turning, say, a normal breast or colon or liver cell into a cancerous one, and a pattern of activity that signals how aggressive that malignancy will be. Those unique patterns also offer targets for treatment, drugs that zero in on the particular genetic pathways fueling the person’s cancer — and even vaccine-like therapies, a fledgling field that aims to train patients’ immune systems to recognize and fight their tumors.

It all started with the 1960 publication of what was dubbed the Philadelphia chromosome, a funny-looking chromosome that two scientists — one from the University of Pennsylvania, one from Fox Chase — spotted only in patients with a specific kind of leukemia. Fast-forward to the 2001 approval of the groundbreaking drug Gleevec, which has turned chronic myeloid leukemia from a fast killer into a disease that many patients today manage with a daily pill. It works by targeting the cancer-causing protein produced by the Philadelphia chromosome.

Gleevec wasn’t the first genetic targeted therapy for cancer — the decades of research sparked by that discovery actually paid off for some other cancers first.

Boyd predicts there will be more than 100 targeted therapies available within several more years, and the real quest is for targets that prove as crucial to holding cancer in check as Gleevec’s did.,

Generating particular excitement now are possible new drugs for hard-to-treat breast cancer, compounds called PARP inhibitors that block enzymes needed for cell growth.

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Parkview LaGrange Unveils New Oncology Clinic

Posted on October 25th, 2010

Read more about it here: http://www.chooseneindiana.com/news.aspx/2010/9/23/parkview-lagrange-unveils-oncology-clinic

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Blue Ball Open Raises $8,600 for CSNI

Posted on October 21st, 2010

Kent Hormann and Cynthia Cornwell had ambitious goals- to organize a golf outing to raise money and awareness for Prostate Cancer. And they were wildly successful. With the support of corporate sponsors, including Lutheran Health Network, the first annual Blue Ball Open, which was held on Saturday, August 14, successfully raised $8,600 for Cancer Services.

On Wednesday, October 20, Kent Hormann and Joe Dorko, newly named CEO of Lutheran Health Network, presented our CEO, Dianne May, with the proceeds from the event. We’d like to thank Kent, Cynthia, Joe and all those involved in making this event successful.

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Beat BC 5K

Posted on October 19th, 2010

On Saturday, October 16, 264 people participated in the 7th annual Beat BC 5K race to benefit Cancer Services of Northeast Indiana. Race results are available at online race results. Jerrod Leatherman won the 5K men’s race with a time of 18:42 minutes. Emily Weber won the 5K women’s race with a time of 20:09 minutes. Brian Guthrie won the men’s 5K walk with a time of 39:13 minutes. For more information, visit http://www.beatbc5k.org/.

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Pigeon or Statue?

Posted on October 18th, 2010

by Gail Hamm, program director

Support Groups are great places to share information and support your fellow cancer sojourners. One night, Tom shared with the group that we could choose to be the pigeon or the statue. He wasn’t talking about the merits of flying versus being rock solid. He was talking about our choice to be either the victor or the victim.

There are certainly lots of times during cancer and the treatments when we may feel put upon. But the only way to survive is to fly like a pigeon. To be alive. To make choices. To not become the statue that all the pigeons roost upon.

Which is it for you? Will you be the pigeon or the statue?

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The Pink Glove Dance at IU Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center

Posted on October 14th, 2010

Employees, patients and others from the IU Simon Cancer Center, the IU schools of medicine and nursing, and Clarian Health are featured in an exclusive IU Simon Cancer Center Pink Glove Dance. Producers from the Medline Industries Inc., the makers of the pink gloves, visited the IU Simon Cancer Center last spring, capturing the enthusiasm and energy of many who support breast cancer patients in their health care journey.

The original Pink Glove Dance video premiered last November, featuring 200 Portland, OR, hospital workers wearing pink gloves and dancing in support of breast cancer awareness and prevention. This year’s Pink Glove Dance: The Sequel premiered September 17 and included 4,000 healthcare workers and breast cancer survivors nationally. The videos have more than 11 million views on YouTube and are spawning and endless number of pink glove dance videos and breast cancer awareness events across the country.

For more information, visit www.pinkglovedance.com.

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Pink Week at Bishop Luers

Posted on October 12th, 2010

For the 3rd year, the Bishop Luers volleyball team has raised money and awareness for Cancer Services during their game against Snider’s volleyball team. And new for this year, all of Luers’ fall sports teams got in on the action. Boys Soccer and Football, Girls Dance and Soccer, the coaches and even fans, donned pink socks, hats and body paint in order to raise awareness for breast cancer.

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It Happened Again

Posted on October 11th, 2010

by Dianne May, president & CEO

It happened again. A woman came in yesterday to learn about Cancer Services. She lost her husband a little over two years ago and she is working to make peace with their cancer journey and what has become the new normal in her life.

As our outreach coordinator, Linda, showed her around the building and explained the help and support that is available, a small tear rolled down her cheek. She said no one told them about Cancer Services when they needed it. She saw the warehouse and remembered the precious time she spent finding and figuring out what kind of equipment she needed to make him comfortable at home. She lamented that she didn’t have someone to talk with; someone to whom she could pour out all the emotions swirling inside her. She asked aloud why no one told them about Cancer Services.

There are lots of explanations. Sometimes the focus is on a search for treatment options and clinical trials. Sometimes, people assume if the family has good medical insurance that will take care of everything. Sometimes it simply gets lost in all the information that patients and caregivers receive.

The next time you learn that someone you know has cancer, make it a point to tell them about Cancer Services. They may already know about the help available, but they might not. Be patient and explain the basics. Make sure that they know you’re not talking about a hospital or treatment center. Let them know that there is something for everyone. It’s not about money—how much you have or don’t have. Cancer Services is here because caring people in our community understand what it means to have cancer and they want to help. Compassion, knowledge and support, it’s what Cancer Services does and you can help by telling people where to find it.

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Gail Hamm, Program Director, Earns New Certification

Posted on October 7th, 2010

Gail Hamm, program director for Cancer Services of Northeast Indiana, has been certified by the Board of Oncology Social Work Certification. This process required extensive documentation of education, training, professional affiliations, community, and professional involvement, and day-to-day work responsibilities with oncology patients. This prestigious qualification is held by only three other individuals in the state of Indiana. Hamm is a licensed clinical social worker with over 20 years of social work experience in hospital, hospice and palliative care, community social services and grief and loss.

Dianne May, President and CEO, says, “This certification is one more example of Cancer Services’ commitment to high quality programs and services for all people with cancer in our region.”

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